Adventures with Julian Assange

If you're a journalism news junkie like me, you may find Bill Keller's recounting of The New York Times' interaction with Julian Assange to be a thrilling read:

The adventure that ensued over the next six months combined the cloak-and-dagger intrigue of handling a vast secret archive with the more mundane feat of sorting, searching and understanding a mountain of data. As if that were not complicated enough, the project also entailed a source who was elusive, manipulative and volatile (and ultimately openly hostile to The Times and The Guardian); an international cast of journalists; company lawyers committed to keeping us within the bounds of the law; and an array of government officials who sometimes seemed as if they couldn’t decide whether they wanted to engage us or arrest us. By the end of the year, the story of this wholesale security breach had outgrown the story of the actual contents of the secret documents and generated much breathless speculation that something — journalism, diplomacy, life as we know it — had profoundly changed forever.

1 comments :: Adventures with Julian Assange

  1. You should read Glen Greenwald on salon.com and follow him on Twitter. He has written a lot about Wikileaks. I don't think he thought much about that article. Greenwald is one of the few journalists that is in favor of Wikileaks. He thinks it would be bad for journalism if Wikileaks was stopped.

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