Did These Graphic Cigarette Warning Labels Come from The Onion?

From the NYTimes comes these actual proposed graphics for cigarette packages:

Designed to cover half of a pack’s surface area, the new labels are intended to spur smokers to quit by providing graphic reminders of tobacco’s dangers. The labels are required under a law passed last year that gave the Food and Drug Administration the power to regulate tobacco products for the first time.

Despite the serious nature of the ads, I can't help but think of The Onion.

5 comments :: Did These Graphic Cigarette Warning Labels Come from The Onion?

  1. Brand cigarettes are my favorite. They make me cool.

  2. This kind of stuff already happens all over Canada. Here's an example of this:
    http://media.canada.com/reuters/OLCACOUNTRY_iptc/2008-06-09T113637Z_01_NOOTR_RTRIDSP_2_CANADA-CIGARETTES-COL.jpg

  3. I don't know about the states, but they've had these in Canada as long as I can remember. I don't know how effective they are for getting smokers to quit, but the pictures were a part of why I never smoked in the first place, despite having smoker parents.

    I don't understand what you're trying to say with these pictures. How does it relate to the Onion at all? They're basically the same as what Canadians have had to deal with. See here (http://www.smoke-free.ca/warnings/Canada-warnings.htm) for an example.

  4. I didn't know that this was a thing in Canada already.

    All I was trying to point out was that it's somewhat ridiculous that the government mandates a consumer product advertise how horrific its side effects will be right on the packaging. What other product tries to discourage you from using it?

    The Onion story I linked to doesn't deal with the same issue but expresses the same sensibility (in the realm of government intervention).

  5. We've had these in the UK for a while. I don't think it's that ridiculous when cigarettes already come with large warnings on them. This is just a few steps away from banning them altogether (which won't happen for a few generations at least because of cultural reasons).

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